The Dirty Little Secret About SSL Certificates

The dirty little secret about SSL certificates is that:
Anyone can become a certificate authority.
The tools to become a certificate authority, and therefore to publish your own SSL certificates, is included in a wide variety of systems - chances are if you have an Ubuntu or CentOS install you already have the capability of becoming an SSL certificate authority via OpenSSL.

Zalman ZM-VE200 Review - You Need This External Hard Drive Enclosure

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Fellow tech friends, I have a find for you. If you have a job,…

What a Resilver Looks Like in ZFS (and a Bug and/or Feature)

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At home I have an (admittedly small) ZFS array set up to experiment with this neat newish raid technology. I think it has been around long enough that it can be used in production, but I'm still getting used to the little bugs/features, and here is one that I just found. After figuring out that I had 2 out of 3 of my 1TB Seagate Barracuda hard drives fail, I had to give the array up for a loss and test out my backup strategy. Fortunately it worked and there was no data loss. After receiving the replacement drives in from RMA, I rebuilt the ZFS array (using raidz again) and went along my merry way. After 6 months or so, I started getting some funky results from my other drive. Thinking it might have some issue as with the others, I removed the drive and ran Seatools on it (by the way, Seatools doesn't offer a 64-bit Windows version - what year is this?). The drive didn't show any signs of failure, so I decided to wipe it and add it back into the array to see what happens. That, of course, is easier said than done.

Disabling The hald-addon-storage Service On CentOS/RedHat

The hald - Hardware Access Layer Daemon - runs several processes…

Why I'm Dropping Boxee for XBMC

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The Boxee platform had so much promise. Since releasing…

Experimenting with Pascal on Ubuntu

I've been busy lately on a number of projects, one of which is…

Twitter Blocked in Egypt: A View From Inside Their Network

I keep various VPSes across the globe for research purposes.…